House cleaning is like stringing beads with no knot at the end of the thread.

"Usually the Lord gives us the overall objectives to be accomplished and some guidelines to follow, but he expects us to work out most of the details and methods." -Ezra Taft Benson-







Saturday, September 28, 2013

Um, we live in Western Washington...what's with the heat?

Yup it's hot here. The heat wouldn't be so bad, except that it is also very muggy. YUCK

This isn't so bad if you can handle it. But the number one killer of infants and the elderly in summer is the heat. You have to have a way to cool off, you have to stay hydrated. That said, some people don't realize they are dehydrated, and that can be dangerous. Dehydration does not happen only when it is hot outside. It can also happen in times of stress, illness, and when it's cold outside.

For babies, signs of dehydration include:
Decrease in wet diapers
Very tired baby, sleepiness
Irritability
Thirst
Sunken fontanel or soft spot
Poor latch
Not wanting to play or smile
Tongue and mouth appear dry
Sunken eyes
No tears when he cries
Vomiting

These signs can also be used for children.

Dehydration Chart

Degree of dehydrationPretty Parched
MoodRestless, irritable
Eyes or soft spot on head
No tears, sunken
Mouth and tongueDry
ThirstThirsty, drinks eagerly
UrinationLess frequent than normal
What to doIf your child has two or more of these signs, call your pediatrician, give liquids or an electrolyte solution.

Degree of dehydrationDangerously Dehydrated
MoodLethargic or not conscious
Eyes or soft spot on head
Very sunken and dry, no tears
Mouth and TongueVery dry
ThirstDrinks infrequently or unable to drink
UrinationMinimal or none
What to doIf your child has any of these signs, call 911.

Breastfed infants should continue to breast feed. Do not give carbonated, high sugar beverages or dairy products when dehydrated or the child has diarrhea, as this can make it worse.

Treatment Based on Degree of Dehydration Chart

Degree of dehydrationMinimal or no dehydration
Rehydration TherapyJust replacement of losses

Replacement of losses
Children under 22 lbs (10 kg): 2 to 4 ounces (60 to 120 mL) oral rehydration solution (ORS) for each diarrheal or stool or vomiting episode
Children more than 22 lbs (10 kg): 4 to 8 ounces (120 to 240 mL) ORS for each diarrheal stool or vomiting episode
Nutrition
Continue breastfeeding, or resume age-appropriate normal diet after initial hydration, including adequate caloric intake*


Degree of dehydrationMild to moderate dehydration
Rehydration TherapyORS, 1.6 to 3.3 oz for each 2 lbs of body weight (50 to100 mL per kg body weight) over 3 to 4 hours
Replacement of losses
Children under 22 lbs (10 kg): 2 to 4 ounces (60 to 120 mL) oral rehydration solution for each diarrheal or stool or vomiting episode
Children more than 22 lbs (10 kg): 4 to 8 oz. (120 to 240 mL). ORS for each diarrheal stool or vomiting episode
NutritionContinue breastfeeding, or resume age-appropriate normal diet after initial hydration, including adequate caloric intake*


* Overly restricted diets should be avoided during bouts of diarrhea. Breastfed infants should continue to nurse even during acute rehydration. Infants too weak to eat can be given breast milk or formula by medical personnel through a tube. Lactose-containing formulas are usually good. If the baby can’t absorb lactose-based formula, lactose-free formulas can be used. Complex carbohydrates, fresh fruits, lean meats, yogurt, and vegetables are all recommended. Carbonated drinks or commercial juices with a high concentration of simple carbohydrates should be avoided.

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